1-1banner
 
medpundit
 

 
Commentary on medical news by a practicing physician.
 

 
Google
  • Epocrates MedSearch Drug Lookup




  • MASTER BLOGS





    "When many cures are offered for a disease, it means the disease is not curable" -Anton Chekhov




    ''Once you tell people there's a cure for something, the more likely they are to pressure doctors to prescribe it.''
    -Robert Ehrlich, drug advertising executive.




    "Opinions are like sphincters, everyone has one." - Chris Rangel



    email: medpundit-at-ameritech.net

    or if that doesn't work try:

    medpundit-at-en.com



    Medpundit RSS


    Quirky Museums and Fun Stuff


    Who is medpundit?


    Tech Central Station Columns



    Book Reviews:
    Read the Review

    Read the Review

    Read the Review

    More Reviews

    Second Hand Book Reviews

    Review


    Medical Blogs

    rangelMD

    DB's Medical Rants

    Family Medicine Notes

    Grunt Doc

    richard[WINTERS]

    code:theWebSocket

    Psychscape

    Code Blog: Tales of a Nurse

    Feet First

    Tales of Hoffman

    The Eyes Have It

    medmusings

    SOAP Notes

    Obels

    Cut-to -Cure

    Black Triangle

    CodeBlueBlog

    Medlogs

    Kevin, M.D

    The Lingual Nerve

    Galen's Log

    EchoJournal

    Shrinkette

    Doctor Mental

    Blogborygmi

    JournalClub

    Finestkind Clinic and Fish Market

    The Examining Room of Dr. Charles

    Chronicles of a Medical Mad House

    .PARALLEL UNIVERSES.

    SoundPractice

    Medgadget
    Health Facts and Fears

    Health Policy Blogs

    The Health Care Blog

    HealthLawProf Blog

    Facts & Fears

    Personal Favorites

    The Glittering Eye

    Day by Day

    BioEdge

    The Business Word Inc.

    Point of Law

    In the Pipeline

    Cronaca

    Tim Blair

    Jane Galt

    The Truth Laid Bear

    Jim Miller

    No Watermelons Allowed

    Winds of Change

    Science Blog

    A Chequer-Board of Night and Days

    Arts & Letters Daily

    Tech Central Station

    Blogcritics

    Overlawyered.com

    Quackwatch

    Junkscience

    The Skeptic's Dictionary



    Recommended Reading

    The Doctor Stories by William Carlos Williams


    Pox Americana: The Great Smallpox Epidemic of 1775-82 by Elizabeth Fenn


    Intoxicated by My Illness by Anatole Broyard


    Raising the Dead by Richard Selzer


    Autobiography of a Face by Lucy Grealy


    The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat by Oliver Sacks


    The Sea and Poison by Shusaku Endo


    A Midwife's Tale by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich




    MEDICAL LINKS

    familydoctor.org

    American Academy of Pediatrics

    General Health Info

    Travel Advice from the CDC

    NIH Medical Library Info

     



    button

    Tuesday, November 02, 2004


    The County Election, George Caleb Bingham, 1851


    Election Day Grand Rounds


    Welcome to Election Day 2004 Grand Rounds, a round-up of medically related posts from around the blogosphere. Are you still among the undecided, looking for info on stem cells and healthcare? We've got posts for you. Trying to escape the frenzied election day coverage of the political blogs and mainstream media? We've got posts for you. Just pour yourself a cup of coffee and surf away your election day anxieties.

    For the Undecided: Craig Westover points out that neither candidate understands the flu vaccine problem. Dr. Bradley takes a look at the stem cell debate.

    Matthew Holt says that when it comes to healthcare, ours is the worst in the Anglosphere. To which Backcountry Conservative might respond, " Then why are nurses leaving the UK for the US?" And cardiac intensive care nurse Alwin Hawkins answers similar quality criticisms.

    But while many worry that John Kerry's healthcare plan will lead to government-run healthcare, Trent McBride argues that we already have government-run healthcare.

    Finally, consider this. Twenty years from now will you remember why you voted as you did, much less who you voted for?

    Sleepless Nights: Worrying about the election (and waiting for the results) will surely keep many awake tonight. Let's hope the doctors get a good night's sleep, for as the New England Journal of Medicine pointed out last week, we don't work well when sleepy. It may be hard to believe, but many doctors take exception to that assertion. Is our resistance to sleep due to a deeply ingrained medical culture, or is it essential to a good medical education? (Although, sometimes things never go right, no matter how much you sleep.) Chris Rangel has more. Oh, well, it may all be rendered moot in the future, as Dr. B reminds us, thanks to pharmacological mind enhancement.

    How to Survive Your Doctor: Grunt Doc provides a guide to ER etiquette, while Random Reality provides a guide to 911 etiquette (or 999 in the UK). Nurse Geena warns against mixing friendship with medicine, and Dr. Alice explains why prescription phone-in requests are loathesome.

    Suffer the Children: Caring for children is fraught with its own special anxieties. No matter what the age, there are really two patients - the parent and the child - to consider. For example, treating maternal depression may adversely effect a newborn baby, as Shrinkette notes. Dr. Baker reflects on the blame game inherent in treating teenagers, and their parents. Dr. Winters relates a recent personal experience with the blame game.

    Pathology: Medical student Graham is overwhelmed by pathological knowledge. Dr. Charles notes a novel use of 911. Far from Perfect tells of a personal close call with Group B streptococcus and a thumb amputation at sea. Top of My Head tells the clinical story of a testicular lump.

    Kevin MD provides a guide to screening for heart disease. The conclusion? Scans like this, aren't useful. (via The Eyes Have It)

    Interested Participant has the skinny on the extreme dieter who had to lose weight to qualify for gastric by-pass surgery.

    How 'Bout Those Bosox? CodeBlueBlog analyzes the death by pepper ball of a Boston fan, and Jacob Reider has posted the Schilling tendon procedure - illustrated!

    Food for Thought: The Cheerful Oncologist's autumnal reflections.

    How to interpret a Dean's letter (or any other letter of recommendation.)

    Goethe's skeletal sorrows and David's backside.

    The latest in stethoscope technology - the iSteth.

    UPDATE: I inadvertently pasted the wrong link in the "Sleepless Nights" section twice. The second link should take you to this post. My apologies to all involved.


    Next week's Grand Rounds will be hosted by Grunt Doc.
    Previous Grand Rounds are archived here.
    Grand Rounds is the brainchild of Nick at Blogborygmi. If you would like to host future Grand Rounds, drop him a line.
     

    posted by sydney on 11/02/2004 06:00:00 AM 0 comments

    0 Comments:

    Post a Comment

    This page is powered by Blogger, the easy way to update your web site.

    Main Page

    Ads

    Home   |   Archives

    Copyright 2006